Messages From 430440630640730

 


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#50494 Sep 9, 2009

I hope someone can help. We are traveling in our RV for the next 8 months. I brought my 430 along for my sanity. Wish I could have brought the 730 but room is an issue! I wanted to machine baste a small quilt and thought I would do it by machine. I found the basting stitch which is #19 on the 430 and #21 on the 440. When I chose #19 the stitch comes up and it tells me to use foot #9? Then when I begin sewing, I get one large stitch the machine stops. I have to keep pressing on the presser foot, but no continious sewing, just start,stop! What I would like to know from those of you that have this machine, how does your basting stitch work? Are you having the start and stop problems? Is this normal? We are in Mississippi right now but heading to Panama City, FL this weekend and will be there for 2 weeks or longer. Any help will be appreciated.

Kathy Alden



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#50495 Sep 9, 2009

Kathy, unfortunately it's not a "problem". That's how the basting

stitch works on the Aurora machines. Just keep pumping :)

CJ

Have you "Tinkled" today? - ---Links-Are-Forbidden--- On Sep 9, 2009, at 9:11 AM, kathyalden wrote:

I hope someone can help. We are traveling in our RV for the next 8

months. I brought my 430 along for my sanity. Wish I could have

brought the 730 but room is an issue! I wanted to machine baste a

small quilt and thought I would do it by machine. I found the basting

stitch which is #19 on the 430 and #21 on the 440. When I chose #19

the stitch comes up and it tells me to use foot #9? Then when I begin

sewing, I get one large stitch the machine stops. I have to keep

pressing on the presser foot, but no continious sewing, just

start,stop! What I would like to know from those of you that have this

machine, how does your basting stitch work? Are you having the start

and stop problems? Is this normal? We are in Mississippi right now but

heading to Panama City, FL this weekend and will be there for 2 weeks

or longer. Any help will be appreciated.

Kathy Alden







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#50496 Sep 9, 2009

The way the basting stitch works is to take one stitch, then you need to let up on the foot control, move the fabric, (use the knee lift, it's easier) take another stitch, let up on the foot control, etc. It takes just one stitch at a time to give you the opportunity to move the fabric yourself so that you can make the basting stitches really long if you want. claudia



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#50497 Sep 9, 2009

Your situation is exactly why I make all my students do a basting

exercise. It's such an odd stitch to most people, more of a tacking

stitch than what we would consider a basting stitch. When they do this

in class they all look up in unison with a quizzical look on their faces

wondering if something is wrong. You'll likely be happier using this

built-in stitch than you would be doing it more like the 730 would, but

you can always try your straight stitch as long as it will go, loosening

the needle tension just a bit.

Kari~

Three-o'clock is always too late or too early for anything you want to

do. -Jean-Paul Sartre...My guess is that Sartre was not a quilter.

*



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#50499 Sep 9, 2009

I do not have one of these machines, but could you do a program where it keeps sewing the same basing stitch over and over?

reeter



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#50506 Sep 9, 2009

Thanks to everyone who replied. It is such a weird stitch, and just

wanted to know it was not my machine. My dealer called me back and

explained it also. I just love Quilt Crossing in Boise. They are very

knowledgable on all the machines. I feel lost on this machine, not like

my 730 but I hope to know it inside and out by the time we make it home.

By then I hope to move up to the 830!!


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