Messages From 430440630640730

 


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#45470 May 7, 2009

The L-Print (Power supply) can get hot and smell after a bit. Is your machine on a Battery Back up? If not the extra work of keeping the proper DC voltage for your machine to use could be making things hot. The L-Print is on the hand wheel side behind the back panel. Does that area feel hot to the touch?

.

In His Service

Jim Snoke >

Subject: [430_440_630_640_730] Bad smell

To: 430_440_630_640_730@yahoogroups.com

Date: Wednesday, May 6, 2009, 11:38 AM





I've made a top over something like 2 weeks, a little every day, and noticed at the very end of hemming it that there was a slight warm smell coming from my machine (730E). As always when I've finished a project I cleaned the machine and this time I hoovered the bobbin area and had of course removed the stitch plate, so I could get to as much as possible. I also unscrewed the panel that covers the disc plates and had a look in there but it wasn't dirty, a tiny bit of fluff that I removed. Last week-end I made a pair of trousers and this time the machine had a slight warm rubber smell even before it was warmed through. DH suggested I got it going properly and then we could have a sniff. I sewed the long seams and overcast them and the smell didn't get any worse but it was still there. When sniffing around the machine like a pair of over-excited puppies we came to the conclusion that the smell was strongest around the bobbing winding area. I hadn't wound a

bobbin that day, so we thought that maybe it could be the belt for the hand wheel. I've no idea what material they are made of these days; my old machine has a rubber belt but that is more than 27 years old so I assume things have changed. Of course you can't open this machine as I can open the old one up. I finished my trousers on the old machine; only did the buttonholes on the 730E. I've been wondering what to do next, but today, when I had to quickly make a small purse, I turned it on because I wanted to put an invisible zipper in and I have got the foot for this so it would be so easy to do it on that machine. Just as it started up I had an e-mail that required an immediate reply so left the machine on for about 5 min before I turned around again and this time it smelt even before I sewed on it.

Has anybody else had this happening to their machine and what was the course?

I don't live in same country now as I did when I bought my machine, it's out of warranty anyway, but the local Bernina dealer/service doesn't exactly live up to my standard of good servicing. When I had my old machine serviced it came home almost dripping of oil, it took me ages to sew it off; he has serviced the 730 too, but admitted it was the first he had ever serviced, this is coming up to a year ago now, so I'm very worried about taking it in to him with so little to go on what may be wrong with it.

TIA

Maga







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#45478 May 7, 2009

Jim,

Thanks for taking the time to reply. No my machine is not on a battery back up. It's plugged in to a surge protector that is then connected to the mains. The area behind the hand wheel is warm to the touch but not hot. When we sniffed around we also had a good hands-on with the machine but nothing was warmer then for example my laptop gets. Is it likely to harm the machine if I go on using it, you think? I would obviously rather pay for a minor repair than have it burn from within. A service might be a good idea as it is just about year since the last one and if they open it up I assume they should be able to find out if anything is wrong?

Maga



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#45479 May 7, 2009

A service would find any build up that could be helping with the warm up issue. However, I highly suggest that you put that machine on a battery back up that will keep feeding your machine consistent clean power at all times. The biggest killer of the boards in your machine is fluctuating power, especially low fluctuations. Surge protectors do absolutely nothing to protect your machine from these power changes. If you burn out a board in your machine you could be looking at a thousand dollar repair. A $100 UPS could save you this expense and greatly extend the life of your machine.

.

In His Service

Jim Snoke >



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#45480 May 7, 2009

I have about a $40 hot shot good brand name protector, way over what I was told to get for the ? number, can't remember the term used. Is this one good enough or do you have a brand to recommend? I have an old APC unit that I bought with my first computer, it was about $100, then, but I don't know if it has a battery to it, doesn't look like it to me. I have that one hooked to the laptop right now.

reeter>



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#45481 May 7, 2009

I am going to look into a battery back up, something I've never heard of before. Is there any great difference between brands of these things (yikes got to find out what they are called in French now) or will any do a good job? For my peace of mind I'll take the machine in for a service and see if they come up with a specific problem and then by the time that's happened, I'm sure to have gotten hold of bbu. Thanks again

Maga> A service would find any build up that could be helping with the warm up issue. However, I highly suggest that you put that machine on a battery back up







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#45482 May 7, 2009

As long as it handles the machine wattage it will do fine. (110 watts, I suggest 150 Watts)

.

In His Service

Jim Snoke >



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#45483 May 7, 2009

Just go to a computer sales place and see what they sell to protect the computers.

.

In His Service

Jim Snoke >



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#45484 May 7, 2009

Joules (I had never heard that term before then), that is what the term

was. I got way over the number that was recommended at the store where I bought the 730. Thanks.

reeter>



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#45485 May 7, 2009

Will have a good rummage around when I go into the city centre.

Great advice.

Maga >



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#45506 May 9, 2009

.Ok, I have a problem here regarding "battery backups"... are they not also know as UPS? Universal Power Supply. Does anyone remember maybe Dec '08 time frame, there was. this same discussion or maybe it was another group. I looked back in the messages but did not find what I wanted.

The discussion was very, very though! One of the gentleman on the site, went into great detail regarding.this electric issue and power going to your house. I ended up emailing APC, which makes a UPS and was told that UPS's are NOT for moving appliances, computers, yes. They even emailed me back however, we are on a long road trip and I do not have good internet connection to check my past emails. However, I believed I had sent it out but can not find it.

I do not want to confuse the issue however I would like to know the answer also because I took my 730 off the UPS. I will email APC again and see what there answer is. After I get the answer I will forward it here.

Judeen ... some where in Minnesota



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#45508 May 9, 2009

Thank you, Judeen, it would be great if you don't mind going through e-mailing again. As I said to Jim, I had no idea there existed such a thing as a battery backup. I certainly want to do the best for my machine as this is going to be my last machine so I want it to last. I'm a bit miffed that Bernina doesn't point out that it would be prudent to connect the machine to a power supply regulator which I suppose the BBU is basically. We do have a lot of power cuts where I am, had one again yesterday in the middle of sewing a seam, very annoying when you've just sat down for some serious sewing time. Here in Europe we have a different power supply system to the US but how I don't know the in-and-outs of the differences, but I assume that it's much the same both places that more and more houses get connected to the same substations so we all have to share and that can give problems at peak periods. A bit like the drains, still the same size as they were a hundred years ago but a lot more houses connected with a lot more waste water than in the past.

Looking forward to hearing what you find out. Meanwhile I'll take my machine in next week and make do with my old machine for some weeks.

Maga







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#45511 May 9, 2009

My bernina dealer did recommend getting protection for the machine. I bought this one. Found it at a Radio shack.

---Links-Are-Forbidden--- had way over the recommended joules amount, so I figured it was safe. We live in an old house that has had a breaker box installed, but the other wiring leaves a lot to be desired. We get these brown outs and probably spikes, too. I had someone tell me this area of the city gets quite a lot of these. I still try to remember to turn off the power switch when I am not using it, though unplugging would still be better, but that is hidden. Old house, few plug-ins.

reeter

I'm a bit miffed that Bernina doesn't point out that it would be prudent to connect the machine to a power supply regulator which I suppose the BBU is basically



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#45518 May 9, 2009

I have one of these and just ordered 2 more on line(before I heard of ups.) The ones I bought were $95. each. Are these the same as the ups? I am truly confused now. I never heard of ups untill the other day on this board. I think my husband will have a (fit) if these are wrong so will I. I know they work on our home entertainment center. Boy do I hope I am right



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#45521 May 9, 2009

The person at APC has no clue how a Bernina machine works. I assume their concern is the motor being in a UPS because they think it runs on AC power. The motor in the newer computerized machines run 100% DC power. Matter of fact everything inside these computerized machines is DC. The voltages are different but it is still DC power. If they were running on AC power the person at APC would be correct because a simple UPS would not deal with that well. Your machine is the same as a computer in the circuits of a UPS. Your L-Print/Power Supply in your machine is the only part that sees AC power. It does the exact same thing that a computers power supply does which is convert AC power to multiple levels of DC power.

.

In His Service

Jim Snoke >

Subject: Re: [430_440_630_640_730] Re: [430_440_630_640_730-jms] Bad smell

To: 430_440_630_640_730@yahoogroups.com

Date: Friday, May 8, 2009, 8:03 PM





.Ok, I have a problem here regarding "battery backups"... are they not also know as UPS? Universal Power Supply. Does anyone remember maybe Dec '08 time frame, there was. this same discussion or maybe it was another group. I looked back in the messages but did not find what I wanted.

The discussion was very, very though! One of the gentleman on the site, went into great detail regarding.this electric issue and power going to your house. I ended up emailing APC, which makes a UPS and was told that UPS's are NOT for moving appliances, computers, yes. They even emailed me back however, we are on a long road trip and I do not have good internet connection to check my past emails. However, I believed I had sent it out but can not find it.

I do not want to confuse the issue however I would like to know the answer also because I took my 730 off the UPS. I will email APC again and see what there answer is. After I get the answer I will forward it here.

Judeen ... some where in Minnesota







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#45528 May 10, 2009

Thanks, Jim

Judeen



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From: Jim Snoke staticjolt@...>

To: 430_440_630_640_730@yahoogroups.com

Sent: Saturday, May 9, 2009 2:14:15 PM

Subject: Re: [430_440_630_640_730] Re: [430_440_630_640_730-jms] Bad smell



The person at APC has no clue how a Bernina machine works. I assume their concern is the motor being in a UPS because they think it runs on AC power. The motor in the newer computerized machines run 100% DC power. Matter of fact everything inside these computerized machines is DC. The voltages are different but it is still DC power. If they were running on AC power the person at APC would be correct because a simple UPS would not deal with that well. Your machine is the same as a computer in the circuits of a UPS. Your L-Print/Power Supply in your machine is the only part that sees AC power. It does the exact same thing that a computers power supply does which is convert AC power to multiple levels of DC power.

.

In His Service

Jim Snoke >

Subject: Re: [430_440_630_ 640_730] Re: [430_440_630_ 640_730-jms] Bad smell

To: 430_440_630_ 640_730@yahoogro ups.com

Date: Friday, May 8, 2009, 8:03 PM

.Ok, I have a problem here regarding "battery backups"... are they not also know as UPS? Universal Power Supply. Does anyone remember maybe Dec '08 time frame, there was. this same discussion or maybe it was another group. I looked back in the messages but did not find what I wanted.

The discussion was very, very though! One of the gentleman on the site, went into great detail regarding.this electric issue and power going to your house. I ended up emailing APC, which makes a UPS and was told that UPS's are NOT for moving appliances, computers, yes. They even emailed me back however, we are on a long road trip and I do not have good internet connection to check my past emails. However, I believed I had sent it out but can not find it.

I do not want to confuse the issue however I would like to know the answer also because I took my 730 off the UPS. I will email APC again and see what there answer is. After I get the answer I will forward it here.

Judeen ... some where in Minnesota






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