Messages From beadingaholics

 


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#46385 May 30, 2008

That's what I was originally thinking (and hoping), but I've had them

at a truer value and nothing moved. I've joined forums, I've blogged,

taught classes, exchanged links, joined webrings (and other things

that don't come to mind right now), done the social networking thing,

but I've not seen noticeable results of anything. The price reductions

were in an effort to try-and-see if that would make a difference. It's

been discouraging. I get very positive responses from my things, but

it doesn't convert to sales. That's why I thought price was the issue.

(sigh)

Maybe there's something that's off-putting about my website that I

don't see. I gladly welcome constructive criticism if anyone would

like to look. :)

Erin

shoppe: ---Links-Are-Forbidden--- h**p://e-maille.blogspot.com

"Check your e-maille!"> Ingrid



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#46420 May 31, 2008

"Maybe there's something that's off-putting about my website that I

don't see. I gladly welcome constructive criticism if anyone would

like to look. :)Erin"

Erin,

I looked & think it's a lovely site. The only suggestion that I could

give is that I personally like to see the items on a person such as the

rings on a finger or the necklace around a neck. It gives me a much

better idea of how they hang etc. This may or may not help as I'm not

sure how other people shop...

:) Terri



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#46424 May 31, 2008

I think Lisa has hit the right point. I only bead for fun now but I

do work on the marketing side for my living. So I feel compelled to

share the marketing side of the view (although my employer is not in

jewelry business).

Erin, you mentioned that you have "joined forums, blogged, taught

classes, exchanged links, joined webrings (and other things that

don't come to mind right now), done the social networking thing",

etc. But you have to understand these are just means to reach the

customers, but you have to understand who the customers are first.

Then, and only then, you worry about the means.

I think since we have so many jewelry artists here, collectively

this is probably the best place to find out the target market. In

many businesses, the notion of ....a typical customer.... is very

useful. Is the customer he or she? How much can she spend on jewelry

each month? Why does she buy it from you not from the big box

stores? Is it the quality or the price that attracts her? Where do

you usually meet your customers? Home party? Online forum?

Introduced by other people in myspace? Which online forums, social

networking site does she normally go to (not where you the seller

normally goes to)? What kind of jewelry piece does she normally buy?

(You can dig out such information from Etsy, Ebay, etc)

I think you should get my point by now. You need to reach out your

customers by going to where they are, not by going round where you

are. I think people who simply try the means you mentioned above

without a clear focus, is like shooting a deer in the dark.

Occasionally, you might get lucky, especially when bullets are

cheap. But in your case, it has drained your bullets (your energy)

without producing any results.

So take your aim instead!

I guess once you see things from your customer....s angle, how you

price your item and even what you make (wine charm v.s. individual

charm example below), will be very clear. You will probably also

find out that selling to an existing customer for her other needs is

much easier than selling a piece to a new customer, etc.

I hope this help.

-- Jennifer

--- In Beadingaholics@yahoogroups.com, Two Left Feet






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