Messages From ldsig

 


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#28247 Oct 10, 2001

Lee Nicholas,

You have been using fans to circulate air in your basement UCW layout.

Are you still doing that?

How successful is/was it?

Paul Catapano



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#28285 Oct 12, 2001

Paul > Lee Nicholas,

> You have been using fans to circulate air in your basement UCW layout.

> Are you still doing that?

> How successful is/was it?

>Yes I still have large floor fans located under the layout at various

locations, 6 total. They do a great job of moving the air and keeping things

comfortable. I run them all at low speed. I also have a large fan in a

basement window, pointed to direct air out the window if needed.

I removed all the skirting under the layout a few years ago for a couple of

reasons: it provides easier access to the underside of the layout and allows

for air circulation hence the use of the floor fans.

Also the move to compact fluorescent lighting a couple of years ago has

reduced the heat buildup by 2/3's so the demand for air movement is not what

is was but we still have a few of the fans running most of the time.



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#28287 Oct 12, 2001

>I removed all the skirting under the layout a few years ago for a coupleof >>reasons: it provides easier access to the underside of the layout andallows >>for air circulation hence the use of the floor fans. -- Lee Nicholas

_________________

My thinking has been just the opposite: use the skirting and ceiling-high

backdrop to create a path for air to flow down one aisle, around the

peninsula,

and out the end of the other aisle, thanks to an exhaust fan in the garage

wall.

This mimics coal-mine circulation methods. One remaining design issue is

a way to cover the fan with a fire-resistant cover when not in use to

maintain

firecode safety standards. That sounds doable.

Tony







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#28290 Oct 12, 2001

>>I removed all the skirting under the layout a few years ago for a couple

> of

> >>reasons: it provides easier access to the underside of the layout and

> allows

> >>for air circulation hence the use of the floor fans. -- Lee Nicholas

>

> _________________

> My thinking has been just the opposite: use the skirting and ceiling-high

> backdrop to create a path for air to flow down one aisle, around the

> peninsula,

> and out the end of the other aisle, thanks to an exhaust fan in the garage

> wall.

> This mimics coal-mine circulation methods. One remaining design issue is

> a way to cover the fan with a fire-resistant cover when not in use to

> maintain

> firecode safety standards. That sounds doable. -- Tony

>I tried forcing the air around the peninsulas to an exhaust fan in the

window before I took the skirting down. It did work but was not nearly as

effective as what I'm doing now.

Lee



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#28298 Oct 12, 2001

At 09:46 AM 10/12/2001 -0400, J Anthony Koester wrote: >My thinking has been just the opposite: use the skirting and ceiling-high

>backdrop to create a path for air to flow down one aisle, around the

>peninsula,

>and out the end of the other aisle, thanks to an exhaust fan in the garage

>wall.

>This mimics coal-mine circulation methods. One remaining design issue is

>a way to cover the fan with a fire-resistant cover when not in use to

>maintain

>firecode safety standards. That sounds doable.

Use what is sometimes called a "flapper grill" (as opposed to a flapper

girl, which is a 1920's phenomenon) or fan shutter. These are used on

whole house attic fans, although these usually have half the flaps mounted

one way and the other half mounted the other way. For a wall mount, use

a grill where all the flaps are mounted the same way. The air flow itself

opens the shutters, which fall back to a closed position when the fan is

off.

McMaster-Carr (www.mcmaster.com) has a shutter fan, as #19455K21.

Richard F. Weyand, President

The Trade Secret Office, Inc.

www.thetso.com

1-800-TSO-Shhh!






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