Messages From ldsig

 


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#10309 Apr 4, 2000

Dear Friends,

G..day everyone! I have one question to you all, about the railroadtracks to

and from coal/ore mines and on logging railroads. Can you please tell me how

I can get the tracks look really worn from all the wear and tear and lack of

maintenance often found on these tracks? I also have a hard time to decide

if I should have a two track mainline or singletrack one, which is the best

and most interesting way to go? I plan to use my favorite coal haulers

(N&W, RDG, WM and LV) as inspiration for the coal and ore traffic, what kind

of mainline did they have? Any help is very much appreciated!

My very best regards,

Jan-Olov.



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#10340 Apr 5, 2000

Jan-Olov:

Try looking in the Jan. 2000 issue of RMC as there is a good article on

doing just this. Also check out the work of Bill Darnaby and FSM's George

Sellios in the book the Fabulous Franklin and South Manchester RR. Bill

Darnaby's article was in Model Railroader but I can't remember which one

about a year ago.

It is best to modelfrom photos so collect as many as you can from the

magazines and actual visits if you can. Hope this helps a little.

Dave Bayless

----- Original Message -----

From: "Jan-Olov" black.knight@...>

To: "Layout Design & Special Interest Group" ldsig@onelist.com>

Sent: Tuesday, April 04, 2000 12:35 PM

Subject: [ldsig] Branchline and mine tracks.

> Dear Friends,

> G..day everyone! I have one question to you all, about the railroadtracks

to

> and from coal/ore mines and on logging railroads. Can you please tell me

how

> I can get the tracks look really worn from all the wear and tear and lack

of

> maintenance often found on these tracks? I also have a hard time to decide

> if I should have a two track mainline or singletrack one, which is the

best

> and most interesting way to go? I plan to use my favorite coal haulers

> (N&W, RDG, WM and LV) as inspiration for the coal and ore traffic, what

kind

> of mainline did they have? Any help is very much appreciated!

> My very best regards,

> Jan-Olov.

>

>

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#10380 Apr 7, 2000

G..day everyone! I have one question to you all, about the railroadtracksto > and from coal/ore mines and on logging railroads. Can you please tell mehow > I can get the tracks look really worn from all the wear and tear and lackof > maintenance often found on these tracks?---------------

Part of the illusion is make a visible difference between the high grade

track and the lower grade track. You don't normally want to make a physical

difference between the actual quality of the trackwork or you will end up

with a lot of derailments.

1. Color - keep the ties on the main line darker and more uniform with a

consistant clean ballast color. The branches should be lighter (more faded

or untreated ties) and with dirty, muddy ballast.

2. Vegetation. The main should have close to a even edge where the ballast

ends and the vegetation begins with minimal weeds on the track structure.

The branches can have grass and weeds growing right up on the tracks. You

could even use some small tufts of twine to represent tall weeds. they have

to be soft and flexible enough to not impede a car rolling over them.

3. Tie spacing. Mainlines have closer, more consistant tie spacing. If

you really wanted to spend some time on a branch line, cut the ties apart on

a strip of flex track (so each tie can move independently of the others)

remove every fifth or sixth tie and respace the others to more uneven and a

little cocked alignment. Be careful, too much of an angle will cause the

guage to narrow and cause problems. Or just go ahead and hand lay it.

4. Poor track condition. Clip off a little off the tie ends to make a few

uneven lengths. Break a few ties. A typical pattern is for the area under

the rail to sink down and the tie become "high centered" and then break in

the middle, so the rails would be down and the ends and the middle up a

little. Puddle a little dirt colored plaster over the ops of the ties

along the rails to represent "pumping" mud. Especially common around frogs,

joints and grade crossings.

5. Lighter rail. Use a smaller rail on the branches. Use code 100 on the

mains and code 83 or 70 or even 55 on the branches. A friend is handlaying

mains in code 83, sidings in code 70, yard tracks in code 55 and a few

industry tracks in code 40.

--------------- > I also have a hard time to decide

> if I should have a two track mainline or singletrack one, which is thebest > and most interesting way to go?---------------

Single track is in most cases "more interesting", but most of the main lines

on the Eastern carriers were multiple tracks.

Dave H. >







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#10383 Apr 7, 2000

One thing I might add to Dave's great list

of things to do.

I always paint my rails with an airbrush

AFTER I ballast. Especially on old track.

You want that rust color to be on the tie

tops, tie plates and ballast as that is where

it bleeds down to from the rails. Also, older

little used rail is darker then rail that is used

more often. So if you are modeling an abandoned

spur, the rail will be dark brown rust color.

Don't forget mud splashes on ties and rail

too. Along with oil spots on ties, ballast and

rails.

Really the best thing to do as I do is jump

in the car and find some type of track like

this and take several pictures that you can study.

I take pictures of track, spills, turnouts, ties,

etc.. all over the country when I travel. Because,

ballast, especially, is different all over due to

the type of rocks in different areas. So shale

ballast might be good for me but would look

weird on your layout.

Hope this helps.

Terry


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